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FICTION

alt text: image is a color graphic of a zoomed-out terrain; title card for Madari Pendas's flash fiction piece "Instructor Feedback"

Instructor Feedback by Madari Pendás

May 20, 2022

  Thank you for your submission. We must begin with the lines—far too restated in this piece. Like I’ve mentioned before, a good artist looks more at their subject than at the paper. Think about what your mind is naturally…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of pink oracle cards; title card for Adelina Sarkisyan's short story "Terrible Things"

Terrible Things by Adelina Sarkisyan

May 6, 2022

  I We’re closer than sisters. That’s what she tells me on the night of the full moon. We undress in her bedroom and wrap our hair with twine. This is what sisters do, she says, spreading a deck of…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of a desert road; title card for the flash fiction piece "De Nuevo" by A.J. Rodriguez

De Nuevo by A. J. Rodriguez

April 29, 2022

  The blocks of the Westside development whipped by us. All the houses bled into one another, a single stroke of adobe beige. No veterinarian had settled into this part of Albuquerque—it was too new, plastic, hollow. If one had…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of teal paint strokes; title card for the flash fiction piece "Riders" by Pete Stevens

Riders by Pete Stevens

April 22, 2022

  My wife wants to know what my new job is, the title, so I tell her what the woman at dispatch told me, that I’m a nonemergency medical driver, which means I’m there when the situation isn’t dire, when…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of a bicycle's handlebars and bell; title card for the flash fiction piece "What the Mouth Knows" by Amina Gautier

What the Mouth Knows by Amina Gautier

April 15, 2022

  We search the face of every old Puerto Rican man we meet, hoping to see our grandfather’s face looking back at us. The way to and from school is paved with old brown Boricua men. Up Riverdale and Rockaway,…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of train tracks in a tropical environment; title card for the flash fiction piece "Fangs" by Tara Isabel Zambrano

Fangs by Tara Isabel Zambrano

April 8, 2022

  The monsoon our mother delivers a boy, we’re saved from our father’s anger. Our hands are raw, unrecognizable, carrying hot water, tugging clean sheets beneath our mother’s heels, taut like our names. The baby looks whittled out of a…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of a small campfire; title card for the flash fiction piece The Life Cycle of Fire by Rosaleen Lynch

The Life Cycle of Fire by Rosaleen Lynch

April 6, 2022

  We can’t take Mam’s new baby to school, the boys guess as much from my silence and nobody wants Mam to wake and make Baby cry, so when I put him to feed there’s quiet, just suckling sounds and…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of a snowy forest; title card for the flash fiction piece “When It Gets Cold in the South, You Get a Jesus, You Get a Jesus, Everybody Gets a Goddamn Jesus” by Exodus Oktavia Brownlow

When It Gets Cold in the South by Exodus Oktavia Brownlow

April 4, 2022

  Honey, MS, 1973 I When it gets cold in the South, Mama puts Devilish-Daddy out, again. It’s where he belongs, she says, cold is like warm milk to funny daddies like the one y’all got. All it gone do…

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alt text: image is a color photograph of a woodworking space; title card for Zoë Ballering's short story "Substances"

Substances: A School Year by Zoe Ballering

March 25, 2022

  September Every day we met for lunch in the art classroom in the school’s east wing. It was the woodshop before the woodshop closed—a cavernous space full of defanged band saws and belt sanders stewing in desuetude. The art…

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Coming Home to Myself by Bryan Okwesili

March 18, 2022

  I am humming along to Lucky Dube’s voice over the radio on the windowpane. The cavernous room swallows his tenor, leaving his words bare, airy, like scattered feathers in the sun. I do not know what it means to…

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